Governmental buildings – Romania

Most of the governmental buildings of Romania were built during the economic boom of the late XVIII century and all of them are painted in white:  Bucharest’s city hall, Royal Palace, Central University Library, The Palace of Justice, Romanian Police, The Independence Hospital,  Institute of Medicine, The Postal Office, Ministry of Agriculture, etc.  Their color is “Optic White” and the factory that manufactures it claims that it can “cover up any tint or stain.”  The ripolin is a coverage of the past, and a reflection of the today impure world. The political leaders chose to cleanse Romania through this  “white-washing”, this use of white painting for the governmental buildings. This ripolin represents for Le Corbusier the perfect portrayal of a “calm and powerful” building which should be the perfect representation of a governmental construction. However, this colour is used in order to divide, to exclude and ultimately to control the citizens.

 

Palace of Justice

6 + 2 more allegorical statues (strength and prudence)

From the main hall, you can reach the building’s sides through the wide corridors, the stairs providing access to the mezzanine, first floor and the basement. The two scales of honor, are monumental, covered in marbles.

poza-justice-palace

palatul-justitiei-bucuresti-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Central House of the Army, known as the National Military Circle, was built in 1912 taking the place of the “Sarindari” monastery. This neo-classical masterpiece was built by the Romanian architect Dimitrie Maimaroiu to host social events, cultural and educational needs of the Romanian army.

cercul militar national

Victoria Palace is the work of Professor Duiliu Mark (1885-1966), who  made several important public buildings since the mid-30s: Superior School of War, Victoria Palace, the Palace of the General Directorate of Railways – designed not as isolated objects but as parts of urban ensembles. The official function of these buildings and the architectural, cultural and political context of that moment, explain the choice of the neoclassical style and of the simplified language.

Victoria Palace was begun in 1937 and finished in 1944. Due to damages caused by the 1944 bombing, the work was resumed and completed in 1952. Originally designed for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Victoria Palace was during the communist period, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Council of Ministers and became, in 1990, the seat of the first post-communist government of Romania. In 2004, Victoria Palace was included in the list of historical monuments.

Initially, the main facade was, as the side facades, covered with Carrara marble and the two side fill ups had decorative panels carved from the same material; as a result of the damage caused by the 1944 bombing, the two panels were removed and the main facade was rebuilt with travertine tiles.

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Marina Gogeanu

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